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Monthly Archives: October 2015

//October

VSF Funds the Key to Acquire EMT Certification, Staying Debt-free

US Army Veteran Rob ClinedinstUS Army Veteran Sgt ES Rob Clinedinst was about to rule out the opportunity to get his EMT certification—a valuable stepping stone on the way to a nursing degree— because he refused to bring on debt his family budget couldn’t bear. 

Another $1,295 in tuition fees just wasn’t feasible for Clinedinst. He was already a full-time student who had exhausted as many scholarship avenues as he could find to obtain his Associate’s Degree from Tri-County Technical College while helping to support his family. In addition, he was saving and planning so that, with financial help from the GI Bill and FAFSA, he could attend Anderson University’s nursing program.

When he found Ron Demonet’s card while rummaging through his book bag, Clinedinst realized he may have the answer in his hands. He remembered meeting Ron at a Get Connected event at Tri-County Anderson’s campus the year prior. Rob remembered that Demonet had been working on a scholarship fund to cover certificate programs, so he gave him a call. The resulting conversation put Clinedinst back on course to pursue his Emergency Medical Training (EMT) certification.

Clinedinst applied for the scholarship and was approved. VSF covered the tuition cost and Tri-County’s Foundation covered the $170 […]

2017-01-30T17:54:57+00:00October 23rd, 2015|Success Stories|0 Comments

Proceeding Magazine’s “Better Than When They Came”: the Highlights

Provide veterans with more career preparation.

In the August 2015 issue of the US Naval Institute’s publication Proceedings Magazine, Lieutenant Edward Wright, US Navy, addressed the need for a comprehensive plan regarding veteran employment in his article “Better Than When They Came”.

In spite of historical—and even recent—moves to address veteran unemployment, it is still an enormous concern, particularly in men aged 18 to 25, for whom the unemployment rate is 8.5 percent higher than the unemployment rate for civilians of that age group. One of the main culprits for this disparity is lack of preparation. While an improved Transition Assistance Program has offered some relief for enlisted individuals seeking to make plans for civilian life, it lacks power when no peers, or, particularly, superiors are talking about the need for careful preparation.

“One likely explanation for why officers don’t make transition education and training a priority,” reports Lt. Wright, “is that transition is less of a personal concern for them than for enlisted personnel, who are 30 percent less likely than officers to serve the full 20 years or […]

2017-01-30T17:54:58+00:00October 23rd, 2015|Uncategorized|0 Comments